10 OF THE BEST TENCH FISHING TIPS AND BAITS

Shellfish maggots

by Angling Times |

Spring is here and so are the tench! We've decided to compile together 10 of the best tench fishing tips and ait for you to use on your spring and summer campaigns for this great species. To help us put together these great tench fishing baits we asked bait expert Paul Garner to give us some of his favourite tench baits.

From floatfishing in the margins, to long-range feeder fishing, the tench angler has to master many different methods, and learn how to get the best from the available baits.

My tench fishing evolves over the coming weeks as the fish change their behaviour, but there are some tactics that come into play each season for me and which have stood the test of time. Let me share them with you...

1) SHELLFISH MAGGOTS

Shellfish maggots

Maggots often figure very highly in my tench fishing.

Being easier to store than casters, maggots are a convenient choice that have caught me tench on every venue where I have tried them. I always use the freshest and cleanest maggots that I can buy. Every few days I change the maize flour that I store them in, as this does become sour, even if the maggots sweat.

There is one additive that I always use on my maggots when tench fishing, and that is Shellfish Sense Appeal. Just a few drops of this smelly shellfish extract added to a pint of maggots will have a big impact on my catches, and I never leave home without it.

2) YELLOW POP-UPS

 yellow pop-ups

When tench are just getting going in the spring, a highly visible bait often scores really well.

I noticed a few years ago that carp anglers tend to catch tench at this time of year on their chod rigs, especially when using small yellow baits. Following suit with a scaled-down approach, I found myself catching loads of tench on 10mm pop-ups fished on a mini chod rig.

I think that any tench that is cruising past can spot the yellow hookbait very easily, and more often than not will eat it. Don’t expect this tactic to last for very long, though. For some reason it loses its effectiveness by the middle of May.

3) HEMP AS A HOLDING BAIT

hemp

Hemp is a great bait for attracting and holding tench, but I am not convinced that they actually eat much of it.

Underwater filming has shown that tench often pick up hemp but then blow it back out again, rather than swallowing it.

This has certainly influenced how much hemp I introduce, and now I rarely use more than a pint per day. I like to introduce this on a little and often basis, keeping that lovely nutty smell topped up, but not introducing too much bait.

4) COCKTAIL BAITS

cocktail baits

8 - cocktail baits.jpg

You can often get extra bites by combining two tench baits on the hook, especially if you have both baits in your loosefeed.

Try a combination of worm and caster, or maggot and corn, to produce a bait with some movement and more bulk than either bait on its own.

5) SWEETCORN

corn

At one time sweetcorn was talked about in hushed tones, so effective was it as a tench bait, but in recent years it has certainly fallen out of favour with many tench anglers.

This is a shame, as it is still a fantastic bait and if it hasn’t been used heavily on a venue it will often work really well. Carp anglers often introduce lots of corn in their spod mixes, yet never use it on the hook, so they are effectively prebaiting for you!

I normally use two grains on the hook when floatfishing to create a nice visible bait. If you are legering, try a combination of one real and one fake piece of corn.

A small tin of corn is more than enough for a tench session. Try feeding six grains after every bite to keep the fish interested.

6) WORM RIGS

worm rigs

Worms can be quite difficult to fish with, especially if you are legering, as they have a tendency to work their way off the hook.

Overcome this by tying up a hair rig with a rubber caster and a Quickstop on the loop in the hair.

Push the Quicsktop through the worm leaving it fixed between the stop and the rubber caster, and it will not be able to escape. Use a short hair so that the worm is just below the bend of the hook.

The caster not only adds a small amount of buoyancy, but also stops the worm wrapping itself around the hook.

7) KRILL GROUNDBAIT

krill groundbait

Most anglers wouldn’t associate tench fishing with using groundbait, but a few years ago now I stumbled across a great combination that works very well in both a cage and Method feeder – and the tench love it!

I use a 50-50 mix of Dynamite Swim Stim Green groundbait and Krill Meal, and have found this to be supremely effective. Be careful not to over-wet this mix. It needs to be mixed slowly, so that the water is fully absorbed, until you are left with a fluffy texture that binds together quite well.

The Krill Meal is quite expensive, but fortunately you do not need a lot of this groundbait as I use it purely on the feeder – so half-a-bag is plenty for a day session.

8) CASTERS

casters

Casters are a very effective tench bait. I use them on venues where small fish make using maggots difficult. This is not because they are second-best, but because maggots are easier to store both on and off the bank.

Try using two parts casters to one of hemp to keep tench grubbing away all day. There is no need to use real casters on the hook – although you can if you want to – but rubber casters are just as effective and far easier to use. Store casters in the fridge, in an open container so that they can breathe and stay slightly damp.

9) FANTASTIC PLASTIC

plastic baits

Whether it is a bunch of rubber casters, a piece of fake corn, or a plastic pop-up boilie, tench will readily take artificial baits, and so often these can make the fishing so much easier.

I like to keep a range of different fake baits in my tackle box for occasions when small fish make using real baits difficult, or when I want to leave a bait out for several hours at a time.

Don’t worry that they have little natural smell – you can always try dipping plastic baits in additives, or fish them straight from the packet.

10) MATCH THE HATCH

 match the hatch

Very often tench can become harder to catch as the summer wears on. I think this is because their natural food become more abundant and they can pick and choose what they eat.

I tend to switch to smaller baits, such as maggots, by about June when the tench can be more picky.

It is also worth raking the swim lightly before fishing to disturb the natural insects on the bottom. This will draw in the tench and get them feeding hard.

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