“A painless path to pole rig making” – Steve Ringer

Steve Ringer explains how he constructs his perfect pole rigs


by Angling Times |

MAKING up pole rigs has to be one of the most mind-numbing chores there is!

So why not try to make the whole process as easy as possible? There are lots of tools and gadgets out there that you can use to speed things up, and not all of them are originally made with fishing in mind. By incorporating these, I can make up a perfect rig in a matter of minutes, and the job becomes slightly more bearable.

What’s especially important, though, is having a good light source while you’re doing it, so you’re not squinting or left cursing as the float stem misses the silicone rubber for the umpteenth time. A desktop spotlight will help, even better if there’s a magnifying head built into it for close-up fiddly work, and an organised workspace is a must too. You don’t want to be digging out a tub of shot with one hand while holding on to a half-finished rig with the other.

Shot rigs at home

Rather than make up my rigs on the bank, I’m happy to use a shotting jar at home to dot my floats down with just the bristle showing. Once at the fishery I may use extra shot to fine-tune the rigs.

Spare your teeth!

Biting shot on to the line can damage your teeth, so I use a pair of spring-loaded long-nosed pliers. I find the shot sit neatly on the line and can be moved easily without damaging it.

Keep a tight line

I trap the line under a small doorstop weight and pull it tight, ensuring my shot goes on without flying off at the last minute. It’s handy when transferring finished rigs on to winders, too.

Trouble-free loops

With a loop tyer, it takes just seconds to make uniform loops. The Ringers version has two heads, the smaller of which does me fine. Some anglers use the bigger loop to attach rigs to connectors.

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