How to fish for carp with popped-up bread crust and bread flake

All anglers know that carp are suckers for bread crust fished on the surface in the summer, but it is often a very underused bait at all other times of the year. Here we show you how it can be used to catch more carp just off the bottom of stillwaters at any time of the year.

Bread crust and bread flake, by their very nature, are buoyant baits. So they are perfect for use just off the bottom, above any silt or blanket weed.

This is a really simple rig to create, it’s virtually tangle-free, and it’s really productive too with many carp being caught in pleasure and match sessions over the past season.

Here’s how to create it…

Popped-up-crust-rig.jpg

A Your mainline needs to be quite substantial as there is a high chance that you could encounter some very big carp. We would suggest using 6lb as a minimum.

B In order to ensure that the rig is as resistance-free as possible, it’s best to use a short length of line between your leger bomb and your swivel. A 4ins length of strong mainline will be ideal. At one end tie a large swivel, and at the other tie a snap link swivel as this will allow you to chance your lead in seconds if you need a different weight of lead to cast further.

C A leger stop is the ideal item to use to prevent the swivel from slipping down to the hook. If you do not have any leger stops, use a small split shot.

D Your hooklength shouldn’t be too long. Around 6ins is about right. Again you will need to choose a lien that’s strong enough for the carp, so 6lb is a good starting point.

E A large hook is paramount here. Something like a size 10, 8 or even 6 could be used as the swollen bread will help mask the hook once it’s submerged.

A note worth mentioning here is that you will need to cast very gently to prevent the bread coming off the hook. Use a gentle sweeping motion to launch the rig, rather than a punch.

Groundbait feeder rig for river barbel, chub and bream

This simple yet very effective feeder fishing rig is perfect for catching river barbel, chub and bream. It’s easy to make and can be used in deep sluggish rivers through to fairly shallow and swift flowing rivers.

The beauty of this rig is that it can be used to catch all of our larger river species, providing you use an appropriate bait and loosefeed to tempt them.

All you’ll need to tie this rig is a variety of different weight of feeders, some eyed hooks, some hooklength braid, strong mainline, a snap link swivel and a buffer bead.

Buffer beads are small rubberised sleeves that fit over half of a swivel. They can be found at all good specialist fishing tackle stores and are ideal for stopping your swivel from hitting knots and potentially weakening them.

The most important part – and often the most technical – is choosing the right weight of feeder. The feeder must be an open end type. Cage feeders simply release their load of groundbait too quickly, whereas open end feeders hold on to the groundbait until the feeder hits the river bed.

Getting the right weight of feeder requires a few experimental casts. Pick a feeder that you think might offer enough weight to hold still in the flow, cast it out and see if the feeder remains static on the bottom. Ideally you should choose a feeder that only just holds still in the flow – one that will easily dislodge and begin rolling if a fish were to pick up the bait and nudge the feeder out of position.

Two of the best baits for this rig are either large drilled halibut pellets or fishmeal boilies – bream, barbel and chub love them. But you could use maggots, worms, casters, sweetcorn, anything you wish.

The feed you put inside the feeder ought to match the hookbait you’re using. If you decide to use a halibut pellet or a fishmeal boilie on a hair rig, you will do best to use a fishmeal groundbait and pellets in your feeder.

HOW TO TIE THIS RIG

Feeder-rig.gif

A – Larger baits like pellets and boilies should be hair-rigged. You’ll need a strong eyed hook for this and the best way to tie a hair rig is to use the knotless knot.

If you intend to use more conventional baits, just choose a strong hook of a size to suit your chosen bait.

B – It’s your choice whether you decide to use a mono or a braid hooklength. If you decide to use a mono hooklength pick one that will cope with a barbel, so 6-8lb breaking strain will be ideal. If you opt for braid, chose a 12lb breaking strain.

C – Your loosefeed should match your hookbait. Fishmeal groundbait and pellets is an ideal match for boilies and drilled halibut pellets. This combination scores well for river specimens.

D – Your open end feeder should have enough weight in the lead to just hold still in the river’s flow.

E – Use a quick-release snap link swivel to attach the feeder, and a buffer bead to attach your hooklength.

F – Your mainline needs to be strong enough to cope with a big barbel, so choose 8lb or 10lb breaking strain.

How to make the perfect feeder rig for fishing close to islands

Anyone who fishes commercial carp waters will know that islands are a prime area to target for good carp weights. Float fishing is almost impossible due to the amount of line hanging underneath the float - this can catch in overhanging vegetation, so the only effective way to fish tight to an island is to use a feeder rig set up.

Here we show you one of the very best feeder rigs to use when fishing tight to an island feature, in a handful of easy-to-follow steps to make sure you can easily create this rig.

It's worth bearing in mind the style of feeder used here - it's a cage feeder. These feeders are the best choice to use in shallow water around an island as the large holes in the sides allow water to enter rapidly, therefore the attractive groundbait inside escapes quickly to leave a cloud of scent in the water.

1. You will need a 1oz Korum cage feeder, size 16 Korum S3 hooks, size 24 mini swivel, 0.13mm (4lb 12oz) Reflo Powerline for hooklength, Korum Rig Stops, plus Korum Quickstops and Quickstop Needle

1. You will need a 1oz Korum cage feeder, size 16 Korum S3 hooks, size 24 mini swivel, 0.13mm (4lb 12oz) Reflo Powerline for hooklength, Korum Rig Stops, plus Korum Quickstops and Quickstop Needle

2. First, push your hooklength through a Quickstop and tie it on with a simple overhand knot

2. First, push your hooklength through a Quickstop and tie it on with a simple overhand knot

3. Push hooklength through the hook eye – from the back – and measure out the hair length

3. Push hooklength through the hook eye – from the back – and measure out the hair length

4. Tie a knotless knot.  Korum S3 hooks don’t have a gap in the eye, so they are safe with this knot

4. Tie a knotless knot.  Korum S3 hooks don’t have a gap in the eye, so they are safe with this knot

5. On the other end of the hooklength, typically 24 inches long, tie on a size 24 mini swivel with a safe knot like a six-turn grinner. This hooklength attaches on to the reel line above the feeder, helicopter style

5. On the other end of the hooklength, typically 24 inches long, tie on a size 24 mini swivel with a safe knot like a six-turn grinner. This hooklength attaches on to the reel line above the feeder, helicopter style

6. Slide a Rig Stop on to reel line, add hooklength swivel then anotherStop

6. Slide a Rig Stop on to reel line, add hooklength swivel then anotherStop

7. The swivel can spin freely between the Rig Stops, which slide up and down the reel line. This set-upreduces tangles, yet will pull apart if your reel line breaks so you do not tether a hooked fish

7. The swivel can spin freely between the Rig Stops, which slide up and down the reel line. This set-upreduces tangles, yet will pull apart if your reel line breaks so you do not tether a hooked fish

8. Now attach your cage feeder to the reel line, again using a proven knot like a grinner or half-blood. Leave a small tag end on the knot as to account for any slippage

8. Now attach your cage feeder to the reel line, again using a proven knot like a grinner or half-blood. Leave a small tag end on the knot as to account for any slippage

9. Now push the swivel and Rig Stops down the reel line until they are 15cm (6in) above the feeder. Your hook will now drop 45cm (18in) below the feeder when you cast

9. Now push the swivel and Rig Stops down the reel line until they are 15cm (6in) above the feeder. Your hook will now drop 45cm (18in) below the feeder when you cast

10. The finished rig is effective and safe so it can be used at any fishery that enforces a ‘no fixed rig’ policy for fish welfare

10. The finished rig is effective and safe so it can be used at any fishery that enforces a ‘no fixed rig’ policy for fish welfare

How to tie the perfect in-line big carp fishing rig

iycf-14-pic-1.jpg

A simple tubular extension on a strong carp hook can make all the difference between a lost and landed fish. Richard Farnan explains how...

The line aligner was first published by Jim Gibbinson many years ago. The principle behind the set-up is to create an angle that in itself creates a very effective anti-eject rig.

By using a length of shrink tubing cut at an angle, you elongate the overall length of the hook’s shank. Leaving the ‘tail’ of the tubing makes the hook go into the carp’s mouth in a straight line as the fish sucks up the bait. Upon ejection the hook flexes and spins giving it more opportunities to take a hold.

This set-up is best used with popup boilies presented approximately two inches off the bottom, held in place with a small blob of putty upon the hooklength.

The loop knot at the swivel end ensures no tangling upon the cast. Personally I prefer to use an in-line lead with this set-up and by using a leadcore leader everything is pinned to the lake bed, thus not alerting the carp to any danger. This combination is very effective indeed!

line-aligner.jpg

How to tie a Chod rig for fishing silty venues

When fishing for carp over very silty lakes, it is essential to choose a set-up that ensures your rig will not get buried in the soft silt and ruin an otherwise good presentation. And the best rig for this is the Chod rig.

It was specifically designed for just this sort of fishing. The chod has proved to be very successful and has accounted for a lot of big fish recently. It should be used with very buoyant baits and will work superbly in silty areas.

It works upon the principle that the rig can be adjusted to position the bait anywhere along the leadcore leader, so no matter how far the lead sinks into the silt, the bait will be in a prime position to sit above the bottom debris.

This rig incorporates a spliced leadcore leader and fairly tight-fitting beads that allow the hooklink to be semi-fixed anywhere along the length of the leader. Shop-bought Chod rigs are available, for those who don't want to tie their own.

The rig has safety in mind, and the soft beads will easily pass over the spliced joining loop, allowing the hooklink to pull free of the leadcore should a breakage occur.

Here's how to tie your own Chod rig...

A Use a lightweight swivel lead - 1oz is perfect. Keep the lead as light as possible because when you are playing a fish the hooklink will slide down to the lead, so the lighter the lead, the less chance of the fish being bumped off. A short strip of silicone tubing helps neaten the lead swivel.

B This is a leadcore leader. It offers enough weight to sink to the bottom. A 3-4ft length is about right.

C If you want to fix your Chod rig you can place a bead here, between the lead and the hooklink swivel. They need to be semi-fixed - a rubber bead sitting on a short piece of silicone is perfect. It is a personal preference whether you use a stop between your ring swivel and the lead.

D Flexi ring swivel of either a size 11 or 12. It should offer just enough weight to anchor the pop-up. This type of swivel provides a full 360 degree movement, so if a carp sucks at the bait from any angle, the swivel will ensure that the bait can easily move and be sucked up.

E The top stop bead. When fishing in deep silt or weed this bead should be at least 2ft up the leader, but for cleaner bottoms it can be much closer to the lead.

F 2-4ins of very stiff mono hooklink line. ESP and Fox produce some of the best stiff links for the job. 15-20lb breaking strain is about right.

G The hook must have an out-turned eye with a D-Rig knotless knot whipping on the shank. This rig works well with a big hook, even if you are using a 14 or 16mm pop-up boilie. And the perfect bait for a Chod rig is a 14-16mm pop-up boilie that will not sink, regardless of how long the rig is submerged.

Chod-rig.gif

Prevent foul hooking carp when margin fishing

We've all done it at some time - foul hooked a carp in the fin or flank when pole fishing tight to the margins or an island. It's almost inevitable that the feeding carp will, at some time, swim into our lines and become foul-hooked.

Not only is this unsporting, but playing a foul-hooked carp is twice as hard as normal, putting your pole, elastic, hook and line under incredible pressure that often ends in disaster.

Although we cannot guarantee that this technique will prevent carp becoming foul-hooked, it will certainly decrease the chance of that happening. And in turn it will increase your confidence too.

Here's how it's done and how to tie it...

The key tackle requirements are a strong hook (eyed or spade end, it doesn't matter), strong mainline and a short dibber pole float. Then you'll need a handful of No8 shot to dot the float down to the bulbous sight tip.

When we say strong mainline, choose a high-tech line of around 0.18mm to 0.22mm diameter (between 6-10lb). That will be strong enough to cope with the rigors of this style of fishing.

All your shot should be placed together, in a line, below mid-depth.

You'll also need strong pole elastic. A grade 18 will be spot on, but you may get away with a 16 if the fish aren't enormous.

Finally, to fish this technique effectively you will need to use as short a line between pole tip and float. The reason for this is simple. You're going to have to push your rig as close to the margins or island as is possible. Having a short length of line above the float will help you do this effectively.

Plumb the depth carefully as your bait should just rest on the bottom an inch or two. Now you're ready to take the swim on, feed it and start catching.

The trick to the effectiveness of this rig is really very simple. If your rig is presented as close as possible to the margins it'll be positioned just out of the way of the feeding carp. Also, when a carp does pick up your bait and you strike, there's a very high likelihood that the carp will swim directly away from the margins and into open water, where you'll be able to gain control of it quickly. Obviously there's no way the carp can swim forwards, because of the island or the bank.

Take a look at the diagrams below and you'll see why it's important to fish as close as possible to the feature.

THE RIGHT WAY

Diagram-1.gif

THE WRONG WAY

Diagram-2.gif
Diagram-1.gif