How to tie the ronnie rig!

Gardner tackle's Lewis Rhead walks us through the rig of the moment and how to tie it...  

There are rigs and then there is the "Ronnie rig". Some rigs stand the test of time and work year after year. Others are more transient in nature, their tangible benefits are the figment of a twisted mind, and they don’t offer any real advantage in terms of catching carp or being easy to tie!

This one, however, is very special. It’s a rig that’s been used successfully on the quiet for a few years now, being deployed as a tool pivotal in catching some phenomenal big carp from a number of waters. But now the word is out and everyone want's to know how to tie this amazing rig

How to tie the  Ronnie rig

The Ronnie rig is easy to tie and offers the benefits of a super-consistent low pop-up presentation, fished the height of a hook and a swivel of off the lakebed, but without the issues of a naked hook eye that has the potential to snag in landing-net meshes (one of the main problems associated with the original 360-style rigs).

It offers all the advantages and awesome rig mechanics of the hinged stiff rig, but without the need to trying to fish it low to the lakebed, which isn’t the optimum arrangement. When it’s tied right, those of us that have used it extensively have pure unadulterated confidence in it because hook-pulls are almost non-existent. I can’t remember pulling out of a single fish with the Ronnie rig. 

Luckily, it’s amazingly simple to construct thanks to the use of a size 12 Covert Kwik-Lok Flexi Ring Swivel mounted on the eye of the hook. That, combined with a Gardner Mugga hook, offers a highly aggressive, fast-reacting presentation that is ruthless in the extreme!

It’s also extremely versatile. I always have a number of pre-prepared hook sections ready to go, and I tailor the hooklink material to suit the lakebed or the lead arrangement.  

That could mean a lead clip with a long, supple, skinned hooklink such as Ultra Skin in silt, or a helicopter-style arrangement and a Subterfuge fluorocarbon boom on clean sand and gravel.   

Personally, I think balancing it like a hinged stiff rig works best – so the hookbait is slow to sink. Why? If you overbalance the hook by moulding putty around the shrink tube, the hook has a tendency to lie over further and this inhibits it from twisting and turning as quickly as it could (the same drawback you get with a hinged stiff rig).

Realistically, mounting the swivel through the eye means you need to use a ‘nice’ sized hook, and the size 4 Mugga or Continental Mugga are both perfect. You know, some rigs work with some hooks better than others, and this is the one. The Mugga’s curved swept shank and 20-degree inturned eye complement and enhance the mechanics, lining up the shrink tube naturally in a way that gives maximum ‘twistiness’.

Variants of some rigs come and go, but the Ronnie rig is one that I know will stand the test of time. Like all presentations, it isn’t the panacea of all things riggy, but what it is is the best low pop-up rig that I have used. 

Now it's time to show you how to tie this amazing rig so you can go out and use it for yourself!

How to tie

Step 1) 

Start by cutting a 1cm length of large Covert shrink tubing.

Start by cutting a 1cm length of large Covert shrink tubing.

Step 2)

You then position the shrink tubing on the hook shank.

You then position the shrink tubing on the hook shank.

 Step 3)

Attach the hook to a size 12 Kwik Lok Flexi Ring swivel.

Attach the hook to a size 12 Kwik Lok Flexi Ring swivel.

Step 4)

The crook will distort slightly as it is opened up.

The crook will distort slightly as it is opened up.

Step 5)

So once the hook eye is in place squeeze the crook closed with pliers.

So once the hook eye is in place squeeze the crook closed with pliers.

Step 6)

Now bring the shrink tubing back down the hook to this position.

Now bring the shrink tubing back down the hook to this position.

Step 7)

Carefully shrink the tubing down using the steam from a kettle.

Carefully shrink the tubing down using the steam from a kettle.

Step 8) 

Now you can slide a size 20 Target Swivel on to the hook.

Now you can slide a size 20 Target Swivel on to the hook.

Step 9)

Follow this with a hook stop to keep the swivel in place

Follow this with a hook stop to keep the swivel in place

Step 10)

Position the hook stop opposite the barb as shown here. 

Position the hook stop opposite the barb as shown here. 

Step 11) 

Attach your pop-up hookbait with some bait floss. 

Attach your pop-up hookbait with some bait floss. 

Step 12)

Mould some tungsten putty around the shrink tube to balance the bait.

Mould some tungsten putty around the shrink tube to balance the bait.

How to tie the pop-up boilie maggot rig!

Maggots are a superb bait in early spring and are my ‘go to’ tactic when times get hard. The key in is to use a maximum amount of attraction and minimal food. I see a lot of anglers using bucketfuls of maggots, but I really don’t think you need that many.

At this time of year, if you can find the fish you only need a small amount of bait to tempt a bite. Multiple catches can be made using small PVA bags of maggots. 

I like to customise my maggots a little, in order to maximise their pulling power. Normally I apply a splash of liquid additive to them the night before, my favourite being L-Zero 30-T, which is naturally very salty and fishy. The maggots take on the flavour of the liquid and by the morning will be oozing with extra attraction.

When I’m buying maggots in the tackle shop, I always ask for them to be sieved. With no maize meal or sawdust, they will sweat up quickly, and so to prevent this I add some Krill Active Mix or powder. Krill works brilliantly with maggots and they will again take on the flavour of the powdered additive. 

I use the ‘boosted’ maggots in a PVA bag and add some crumbed Krill boilies too. I hook the bag on to my rig to add all that taste, smell and the small amount of food around the hookbait.

On the rig, I like to use a 12mm Signature pop-up fished just off the bottom. Then, I tie five maggots to the hair loop of the hooklink using a length of bait floss (see sequence, below). I find that five is enough to catch the carp’s eye, but not too many to affect the buoyancy of the pop-up, which would change the way the rig is sitting. 

This is fished with a simple combi-rig, with the supple section coming near the hook. This allows the pop-up to sit just off the lakebed, anchored down by a blob of putty. Adopting these tactics has helped me catch some special fish over the last few years. Last autumn, I had a number of carp to over 41lb using this approach - at a time when the lake hadn’t been fishing well and the carp had been hard to catch! 

How to tie

Step 1.

Start off by pouring a generous helping of Sticky Baits’ L-Zero 30-T over the maggots

Start off by pouring a generous helping of Sticky Baits’ L-Zero 30-T over the maggots

Step 2.

Next, add a small amount of Krill Active Mix to prevent the maggots from sweating too much

Next, add a small amount of Krill Active Mix to prevent the maggots from sweating too much

Step 3.

The maggots should now look like this. They will be packed full of fishy attraction

The maggots should now look like this. They will be packed full of fishy attraction

Step 4.

Choose a 12mm pop-up boilie in whichever colour you fancy. Yellow and white work well

Choose a 12mm pop-up boilie in whichever colour you fancy. Yellow and white work well

Step 5.

Use a baiting needle to thread the pop-up on to the hair loop of your hooklink, as normal

Use a baiting needle to thread the pop-up on to the hair loop of your hooklink, as normal

Step 6.

Next, using a pair of sharp braid scissors, cut off a 30cm length of bait floss

Next, using a pair of sharp braid scissors, cut off a 30cm length of bait floss

Step 7

Take a sewing needle and thread on five maggots, nicking them only very lightly

Take a sewing needle and thread on five maggots, nicking them only very lightly

Step 8.

Thread one end of the bait floss through the eye of the sewing needle

Thread one end of the bait floss through the eye of the sewing needle

Step 9.

Carefully push the maggots on to the bait floss, making sure you don’t burst any of them

Carefully push the maggots on to the bait floss, making sure you don’t burst any of them

Step 10.

Pass the floss through the hair’s loop and secure with a couple of overhand knots

Pass the floss through the hair’s loop and secure with a couple of overhand knots



Tommy Pickering | How to make my simple groundbait feeder rig!

This is my favourite set-up for all my open end feeder fishing. It’s a very simple rig for wire cage and plastic frames, and the stiff boom which is tied in the end of the mainline means tangles are kept to a minimum. 

As it’s free running it’s completely safe, too. Use it for bream, tench, roach, perch and even carp.  All you need is your reel line, your feeder with a swivel eye or snap link attached, a packet of No8 Preston Stotz weights and your chosen hooklength. 

Try this simple and tangle-free feeder set up. 

Try this simple and tangle-free feeder set up. 

Step 1.

Take the mainline or shockleader between thumb and first finger of both hands and twist in opposite directions to twizzle it together.

Take the mainline or shockleader between thumb and first finger of both hands and twist in opposite directions to twizzle it together.

Step 2.

Ensure that the length of the twizzled line is longer than that of the feeder and link, to stop the two tangling when you cast the finished rig.

Ensure that the length of the twizzled line is longer than that of the feeder and link, to stop the two tangling when you cast the finished rig.

Step 3.

Bring the twisted line back over itself to form an overhand loop knot. Pass the end through itself twice and pull to tighten the knot properly.

Bring the twisted line back over itself to form an overhand loop knot. Pass the end through itself twice and pull to tighten the knot properly.

Step 4.

You’re now left with a twisted section of line of around 6ins long, called a boom. Trim the tag end to reduce line spin when reeling in. 

You’re now left with a twisted section of line of around 6ins long, called a boom. Trim the tag end to reduce line spin when reeling in. 

Step 5.

Now slide the swivel eye of the snap link attached to your feeder on to the twisted line and over the knot of the stiff boom.

Now slide the swivel eye of the snap link attached to your feeder on to the twisted line and over the knot of the stiff boom.

Step 6.

Attach two No8 Stotz to the mainline just above the twisted section, with the feeder above. These butt against the knot and stop the feeder too.

Attach two No8 Stotz to the mainline just above the twisted section, with the feeder above. These butt against the knot and stop the feeder too.

Step 7.

Time to add your hooklength, which you will probably have already tied. Push the hooklength loop over the end of the twisted boom.

Time to add your hooklength, which you will probably have already tied. Push the hooklength loop over the end of the twisted boom.

Step 8.

Put the hook itself through the end loop in the twisted boom. Then pull the whole hooklength through with it as it goes through.

Put the hook itself through the end loop in the twisted boom. Then pull the whole hooklength through with it as it goes through.

Step 9.  

The loop-to-loop forms like this - you may need to flick the hooklength over its own loop knot to achieve this perfect connection. Pull tight. 

The loop-to-loop forms like this - you may need to flick the hooklength over its own loop knot to achieve this perfect connection. Pull tight. 



How to tie Alan Scotthorne's Hooklength Knot

Here Alan Scotthorne reveals the knot that he uses to join a hooklength to his fishing mainline. It's a variation of the loop-to-loop method, but with a twist. It's easy to tie and incredibly strong...

Alan Scotthorne was never really happy with using loop to loop knots for joining his mainline to his hooklength namely because it can potentially cause tangles and it's untidy.

After experimenting with lines he came up with this knot. Well, it's actually not really a knot - it's more of a way of wrapping and twisting a line onto a loop of line. This makes this knot very strong indeed, and therefore reliable enough to be used on silverfish through to commercial carp waters.

But it's developer and creator proves just how reliable and effective this knot it. If it's good enough to a five-times World Champion to use, it must be good enough for every other angler!

Here's how it's tied...

1 Tie a small loop in the end of your mainline and then pass your hooklength line through the loop like this.

SCOTTHORNE-TWISTED-KNOT1.gif

2 Hold the line in your left hand and then double it up with your other hand to create a loop in the hooklength line.

SCOTTHORNE-TWISTED-KNOT2.gif

3 Twist the end of the hooklength that is held in your right fingers. This causes the line to spin and twist around the other section of hooklength line.

SCOTTHORNE-TWISTED-KNOT3.gif

4 Pass the other end of line, with your hook attached, through the loop that is created when twisting the hooklength line.

SCOTTHORNE-TWISTED-KNOT4.gif

5 Moisten the line and pull the knot tight. The tag ends should be trimmed right down as this knot refuses to slip.

SCOTTHORNE-TWISTED-KNOT5.gif

How to tie the Domhoff fishing knot

Step6.gif

Although detailed here using a spade end hook, the Domhoff fishing knot can be used around the shank of an eyed hook, and when tied securely this is an incredibly reliable knot to use.

It is made up of a series of eight whips around the hook shank. This creates a neat lock upon the hook that won't slip and will not lose any strength as the line is pulled tight.

Most anglers do use this knot for tying their spade end hooks (if they don't own a hook tyer) but if you're suffering lost hooks or broken knots when fishing with eyed hooks you really ought to give this knot a try as it's super-secure.

It can be used to tie the tiniest of hooks through to whopping size 2 speciimen eyed hooks - all you have to to is match the strength of line to the hook size and guage and you're on to a winner.

Here's how to tie the Domhoff fishing knot in six easy to follow stages...

Step1.gif

Make a loop in the end of your line. Lie the loop against the shank with about 1cm beyond the bend of the hook. Hold it tight in place between finger and thumb.

Step2.gif

Now take the free end of the line and start to wind it up the hook shank, holding the loop between thumb and forefinger and securing the other part of the line underneath the coils. Keep everything under tension.

Step3.gif

After eight turns or so trap the whippings with your other hand to reveal the loop.

Step4.gif

Now pass the loose end through the loop.

Step5.gif

Dab with a touch of saliva and tighten by pulling on the main part of the line. Make sure the line leaves the hook from the front of the spade or the eye and the coils are neat.

Step6.gif

This is the finished knot. Tie off the tag end neatly.

How to tie the banded knotless knot

Banded-knotless-knot-step-5.jpg

This relatively new knot is one for the angler who needs to catch, bait up and fish at speed.

It gives the angler the hooking power of the knotless knot, while at the same time provides the angler with the ability to attach hard baits like pellets, on to the hair, really quickly.

There's no need to use a drill, a baiting needle or a hair stop when using this knot - the tiny bait band grips around the circumference of the hard pellet secrely enough so that the bait can be cast.

STEP 1

Thread your hooklength through the front of your eyed hook then through a bait band. Now pass the hooklength through the back of the eye of the hook.

Banded-knotless-knot-step-1.jpg

STEP 2

Adjust the length of the loop that holds the bait band until the top of the bait band sits at the top of the bend of the hook

Banded-knotless-knot-step-2.jpg

STEP 3

Hold the bait band and hooklength loop securely. Take the tag end of the hooklength and whip it around the hook and hooklength loop. Whip the line around eight times, keeping tight turns at all times.

Banded-knotless-knot-step-3.jpg

STEP 4

Ensure all the whippings are secure and tight, then make one final whip up and over the previous whippings, then thread the hooklength tag end through the back of the hook's eye.

Banded-knotless-knot-step-4.jpg

STEP 5

Add a drop of Superglue to the whipping to secure it in place, then trim off the tag end as close as possible to the eye of the hook.

Banded-knotless-knot-step-5.jpg

How to tie the grinner knot

grinner.jpg

This knot is widely used by match, pleasure and specialist anglers wordwide, for linking hooks and swivels to either mainline, hooklength or even braid.

It is a very strong and relaible knot that should be dampened thoroughly before it is pulled tight.

As this knot features a small amount of whipping above the swivel or hook eye it does not 'strangle' the item being tied, therefore it retains a huge amount of strength.

STEP 1

Pass your chosen hooklength through the eye of your hook or swivel twice. Pull 4ins of the hooklength through. Now form a loop with the tag end of the hooklength.

Grinner-knot-step-1.jpg

STEP 2

Thread the tag end over the hooklength and through the loop four times, making sure it exits through the loop.

Grinner-knot-step-2.jpg

STEP 3

Moisten the knot thoroughly with saliva and gradually pull it to lock the knot against your hook eye or swivel eye. Trim any waste from the hooklength tag end as close as you can to the knot.

Grinner-knot-step-3.jpg

How to tie the stop knot

Stop-knot-step-1.jpg

The Stop Knot is commonly used by match anglers who need to floatfish a waggler in water much deeper than the length of their rod, but it is even more commonly used by predator anglers when they create their float rigs.

A well-tied Stop Knot provides a moveable point that helps prevent your float from sliding all the way along your mainline, and if it is tied using a length of flexible mono, it will cast through the rings of any match rod on the market.

Specialist anglers tend to use powergum to tie their stop knots, which will still pass through their rod's rings because of the large internal diameter of them.

STEP 1

Lay a 6in length of powergum or thick mono alongside your mainline.

Stop-knot-step-1.jpg

STEP 2

Form a loop with the powergum or mono and thread one end through the loop and over your mainline.

Stop-knot-step-2.jpg

STEP 3

Repeat threading the powergum or thicker mainline through the loop and around your mainline four or five times.

Stop-knot-step-3.jpg

STEP 4

Moisten the knot with saliva, slide it into position upon the mainline then pull it tight. Trim the tag ends to around an inch from the knot.

Stop-knot-step-4.jpg

How to tie the water knot

Waterknot-step-4.jpg

This knot has many uses for the angler. It can be used to link hooklength to mainline, it can be used to join a paternoster link to a mainline, and it can even be used to join mono to braid.

Many angler's use this knot to link their pole mainline to the hooklength, especially when fishing delicate rigs, because it is far more direct than the more commonly used loop to loop technique.

STEP 1

Lay the two lines you wish to tie alongside each other.

Waterknot-step-1.jpg

STEP 2

Form a substantial loop using the two lines

Waterknot-step-2.jpg

STEP 3

Ensure the two lengths of line are together and thread the pair of tags ends through the loop three times.

Waterknot-step-3.jpg

STEP 4

Moisten the knot with saliva or water and slowly pull it tight. Trim off the tag ends accordingly to either create a straight profile when joining a mainline to hooklength, or cut the tag ends to create a paternoster link for legering purposes.

Waterknot-step-4.jpg