Fishing set for green revolution

Grassroots action could help ease angling’s plastics problem

Fishing set for green revolution

by Angling Times |

CONSUMER power is needed for angling to get tougher on unrecyclable packaging, say those looking to make the sport greener.

Big-name anglers and campaign groups are hoping customers can force a change across the industry by pressuring tackle firms to ditch harmful plastics.

Angling artist Chris Turnbull, who runs a Facebook group against single-use plastic in fishing, said:

“A cultural shift is needed. It’s up to tackle makers to educate their market and make green credentials a selling point. It’s now unthinkable for carp and specimen anglers not to use an unhooking mat. We need the same change with litter.”

Schemes like the Anglers’ National Line Recycling Scheme, which has free line-recycling bins across the country, have been a big success, but tackle and bait packaging is still seen as an area for improvement.

At Dynamite Baits, most of the firm’s bags are now fully recyclable and the firm is aiming for at least 90 per cent recyclable packaging and a switch to renewable energy by 2023. Operations manager Duncan Lennox said:

“It’s vital we give people the ability to make informed choices. Much of the industry is ready for change and we’re keen to make the necessary leap forward.”

Dynamite Baits is aiming for at least 90 per cent recyclable packaging and a switch to renewable energy by 2023
Dynamite Baits is aiming for at least 90 per cent recyclable packaging and a switch to renewable energy by 2023

Elsewhere, Sufix has produced Recycline, a recycled mono with a recycled spool and packaging, while Rapala is using recycled materials in its hard lures. Nash Tackle is also producing more plastic-free and recyclable packaging.

Sufix has produced Recycline, a recycled mono with a recycled spool and packaging
Sufix has produced Recycline, a recycled mono with a recycled spool and packaging

Independent carp brand Aptus does not use plastic in any of its packaging, and uses only water and vegetable-based inks.

“It’s slightly more expensive, but not as much as I expected,”

said owner Jack Sherrin.

“Hopefully, the more consumers become aware, the more pressure there’ll be on the rest of the market to change.”

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