Spring Waggler Fishing Tips

Steve Ringer explains why NOW the waggler is the best when it comes to catching the lot

Spring Waggler Fishing Tips

by Angling Times |

It's late spring, carp and silvers can now be caught anywhere from a couple of feet deep right down to the bottom.

However, the water may not yet be coloured enough to make the pole the best approach – that’s when reaching for the waggler rod comes in. The waggler is an old school method, one we all used before poles evolved, and there are actually a few advantages that the float has over the pole.

You can cover more of the swim by casting further out or slightly to one side. You can also, as I’ve already mentioned, fish through the water, covering all depths more efficiently, and you’ll not run the risk of the pole over the heads of the fish potentially spooking them.

I always think that the waggler is a good way of getting bites. It may not catch you as many fish as, say, the pole or the feeder, but it can be a reliable option when the fishing is a bit harder.

How far to cast?

In a swim with an island at 25m I’ll cast the waggler 18m-20m. Fishing a couple of rodlengths out later in the day may result in a big carp.

How far to cast?
How far to cast?

Which waggler?

I use clear insert loaded crystal or peacock floats, starting with one that lets me cast to the spot without having to ‘thrash’ the rod.

Which waggler?
Which waggler?

The business end

Hooklengths are 30cm of 0.15mm N-Gauge to a size 16 Super LWG hook, attached via a mini swivel which also acts as my bottom shot.

The business end
The business end

What to feed

Maggots are a good all-round feed, but for carp I’ll fire in hard 6mm pellets and use a 6mm hard pellet or a 6mm expander on the hook.

What to feed
What to feed
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