How to fish the ‘speed feeder’ for roach and silvers

Steve Ringer reveals a deadly weapon for catching big nets of small fish

How to fish the 'speed feeder' for roach and silvers

by Angling Times |

The feeder is often seen as a method for catching big fish such as bream and carp, but with adjustments to rigs, feeding and the types you use – plus the way you fish it – it’s become a deadly weapon for catching big nets of small fish too.

Known as the ‘speed feeder’, it’s an approach that works well for roach. It’s a busy way of feeder fishing, and completely different to traditional bream feeder tactics.

The key is to fish at a short distance to make things fast, and to not leave the feeder out in the swim for too long, as most bites will come within 60 seconds of the feeder hitting bottom. As a result, the tackle used and the feed is very different, but not that specialised. Once you hit your stride and begin catching, the process becomes very robotic. It’s possible to catch a lot of fish, and can often even be faster than the pole!

It’s become a deadly weapon for catching big nets of small fish
It’s become a deadly weapon for catching big nets of small fish

Use wet groundbait

I’ll feed only groundbait with a few casters or bits of chopped worm or micros, so the only real item of food for the fish to find is my hookbait, which should result in a quick bite. I mix the groundbait up wet so it makes a cloud, but I’ll make it even wetter, almost like slop, if the fishing’s hard.

Use wet groundbait
Use wet groundbait

Pick your feeder

I use two types of feeder – the cage and window. I start with a small 20g Guru cage to get some bait down and make a cloud. When I think enough fish are there, I’ll swap over to a Guru window feeder. This doesn’t give off a cloud, so I’ll switch back to a cage after about 10 casts, then repeat the process.

Pick your feeder
Pick your feeder

Choose the right rig

Having the bait close to the feeder means quicker bites, so I use short hooklengths on my running feeder rig. My starting length is 50cm, but if I was missing bites I’d go to 25cm. Hooks can be big, too, and I’d think nothing of using a size 14 Guru Match Special with a single dead maggot or a worm head.

Choose the right rig
Choose the right rig

Get into a routine

Getting into a routine helps with speed fishing. I cast out so that the braid hits the clip, and keep the rod pointed directly at where the feeder landed. I pull the rod back to the rest, sat at a 45-degree angle. I then put the rod on the rest and wind in to create a slight bend in the quivertip.

Get into a routine
Get into a routine
Just so you know, whilst we may receive a commission or other compensation from the links on this website, we never allow this to influence product selections - read why you should trust us